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What was one of your most scariest moments while on the water or in the field?

Mine happened about 17 years ago while Bow Hunting one November afternoon. It was a cloudy but calm day, perfect to be in the stand hunting Mr. Illusive himself. I drove down to the farm and in 25 minutes I was in my treestand. Now it was perfectly silent all afternoon as I watched the fence line on the corner of a corn field and the big stand of Pin Oaks. As I sat there out of the sky rumbled a monstrous crack. It literally shook every bone in my body to the core. In just a hundredth of a second I saw this bright iridescent blue flash hit the fence post 15 yards in front of me. That crack I heard was nothing to what came next. Boom and I do mean Boom.

The last thing I saw was the spark as the percussion from the blast blew me out of my treestand and placed me in the tall field grass 20 yards from the tree I was sitting in. It took me what seemed forever to figure out what had just happened but the problem now was I couldn't see a dam thing, my ears had a high ringing pitch in them that was skull busting. All I could see was blue squares,pink circles,black boxes and all kinds on weird crap floating across my vision. I had no clue what direction I was facing. I laid in the tall grass helpless for what seemed like forever thinking will I be able to see, will I be able to make it back to the truck so that I can get help? I didn't know.

After 20 to 30 minutes of laying in the weeds my vision started to go white gray and I could make out shadows of objects. The field looked like one massive gray blob but I could see a small black object far off in the distance. I figured it to be the barn so I gradually made my way to the object. It was my truck. I sat in my truck for few hours waiting for my vision to improve and when it did I was like thank God.

I had no idea where any of my gear was at, it could have been 20 foot up in the trees for all I knew. Went back about 2 days later after getting checked out at the Hospital and found all my bow gear exactly where I had been laying in the grass. It was a perfect outline of my body position and was kind of like looking at a Ghost. To this day if I so much as hear a popcorn fart my ass is headed to the truck.

End of Story!

Hope you enjoyed the read, but that was one of the worst things that has ever happened to me why hunting in my life.
 

· the frugal fowler
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Re: Scariest moments why on the water or in the field? Story

I have 3, and I am not sure which one is the scariest.

First one happened when I was 16. We were floating the river for walleyes on a June afternoon. The fishing was exceptional, with a 10% chance of thunderstorms. Little did we know (before the days of the smart phone) there was one single supercell in the entire state and we were in its sights. Once the storm came over the bluff, we knew we were in for it. We paddle as fast as we could for some cover. When the storm hit directly over us, the lightening strikes were incredible. We decided to leave the canoe and head down a stream that fed the river for a little more safety. about 50 yards down the stream was a large tree standing alone in the pasture. We watched lightening strike it, and decided that since lightening only strikes each place once so lets go there. FAIL! about 5 yards from the tree was the last thing I remember. Next thing I knew I was sitting next to the canoe on the river bank, covered with mud and bleading. My buddy was completely out of it. No words were spoken until we hit got to the ramp. The canoe was completely full of water, and the river was rising rapidly. To this day, if there is any chance of a thunderstorm on a day I am going to float the river, I don't go.

The second one was breaking Ice in early December. I was 25 or so, and had busted a pretty decent hole out in front of the blind in my 12 foot jon boat. I was standing and tossing decoys when the front of the boat caught on the ice, and flipped. Some how, I ended up back in the boat, with my gun still around my shoulder, and paddling back to the shore as fast as I could. I ran to the truck (150 yards up) stripping clothes all the way. I sat in my truck with the heater cranked for 20 minutes, grabbed my coveralls for pants, and a spare coat and headed back to the hunt. I limited that day, and it was all the more sweet.

The third one was ice fishing and probably the closest I have ever been to death. there was well over a foot of ice on a lake that it is not permitted to drive on. About a half mile out, I stepped right through a spring, hit the bottom, and shot right back up through the ice. Same situation running back to the vehicle, stripping clothes all the way. Only issue was I could not get my pants off, as they were instantly froze to my boots and legs. It could not have been much more than 10 degrees outside. I sat in the truck until my parents arrived, and took me back to their place. It took a good 20 minutes of full heat to get the pants off so I could warm up. Pretty scary shit, and I kept wanting to fall asleep. I never did go to the hospital, but chances are, If my parents had not arrived when they did, I might have been taking a dirt nap.
 

· IAW Coot Motivator
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I remember a time I was about 15 and my buddies and I were going to duck hunt some public grounds. We walked in and shot some ducks but I kept watching ducks landing on another pothole about 200 yards away. So being young and full of energy I decided to take a hike over. I was pretty new to the area and when I got about 70 yards to the pothole through the woods there was a little stream that was in my way. I looked around and it was only about 5 feet across or so and figured that it can be that deep and I could almost jump all the way across if I wasnt in waders. Well I decided to take the leap of faith and I almost made it all the way across. My feet landed on the side of the creek and to my surprise the bank went straight down. My wader boats hit the side and kept on slidding down the embankment. The wader was coming over my waders and I could not get any traction with my feet. I was about shoulder deep in the water when my foot finally hit something hard (my guess a tree branch) I was then able to spring foward and grab a nearby tree over hanging the bank. This was definetly a close call for me to almost drown in my waders. Now that I am older and wiser I usually step into the water with a large stick and take baby steps until I know the layout of the bottom but even then I always get a sick feeling when I am in the water walking around.:rolleyes:
 

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Was hunting a lake one afternoon, and after the day was over we picked up the decoys and headed back in. On the way we saw a cripple drake mallard standing on the edge of the ice. Not wanting to leave a cripple we turned the boat for him and I sat on the front trying to catch him with my feet as he slipped and ran in front of me, breaking ice the whole way. As we got closer to shore I could see the weeds sticking up through the ice so I figured it was shallow enough and stepped off the boat to get the duck before it got to the timber. Bad idea! The ice broke immediately and it was 3 to 4 feet deep. The boat was still moving forward and it ran up over me shoving me under the icy water. My buddy quickly killed the motor as he saw me disappear and felt the boat ride up on my head. As I went under I started for the side and broke ice to get out from under the boat. My buddy then ran up front and helped me in, then he jumped out and recovered the duck. While I fired the heater up and stripped off some clothes. It was a long ride back to the truck, but all was well and lesson learned.

I also was on the Mississippi one Veterans day, around 98 or so, and the river was shutdown to boat traffic due to extremely high winds. I couldn't resist as ducks were everywhere! I headed out to cross the channel to get to my blind in my 18 ft xtra wide xtra deep mainly empty except for a big box and my lab on the front deck. I was trying to figure out which way to get on plane, into the 4 foot waves, or ride them sideways... I decided to go into them and the wind. Bad idea! The wind gusted as I had the bow riding over the top of one of the monstrous waves and the front of the boat went straight up, the box and dog came tumbling back to the back about smashing me, but that was the least of my worries. I thought I was going over backwards! Luckily the next wave hit the boat and pushed the stern back under me or something, but I landed up right and all was ok. So I went sideways with the waves and made it over to get my limit in short order. It was pretty stupid, but at the time I thought it was well worth it.
 

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It was about 29-30 years ago I was going to hunt right after school on the big lake south of me.
The wind and the clouds were building up fast, I did not have a big hunting rig then.
I got near the boat ramp and decided that it was to rough.
As I turned to get back in the truck another guy came flying towards the ramp yelling some guy was in the lake tipped over, I helped him unload his big wide flat bottom. He yelled get in and hold the front down, when we got around the bend the guy was almost done I reached him by his collar and drug him into the boat.
Best thing I did was forgot to shut my truck off, got him warmed up and never asked him his name!
He asked me if I had seen his dog, I turned and had a very shocked look on my face, his dog was next to my truck cold but alive!
I ask the Good Lord to watch over me every hunt and I sure hope he is.
Dean
 

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I have 2 that scared the crap out of me.
1. It was the first weekend in May, day 1 of a walleye tourn on the missouri river just south of Pierre, SD. We where on our way to the boat ramp (3 miles) to weight in and we noticed a boat in the water and a arm kept coming up and waving around. As we got closer we could see someone in the water and another person bent over the side of the boat. When we approached the boat there was a 13 yr old boy holding is uncle up in the water. We jumped into the boat and tried to pull the man in. We couldn't get him in so we waved in another boat and it took 4 of use to puu the man in the boat. As we started towards the boat ramp we call 911 on the cell phone and I stated CPR on the man. When we made it to the ramp the it took another 20 mins for the ambulance to make it. The man survived and to boy was shook up.
As a result of being a nice guy we missed the weigh in...

2. I duck hunting on a local lake in a 14ft river jon boat. I knew it was going to be a windy day but i didn't think 60 mph was in-store. I picked up by 120 decoys and was heading back to the ramp when i rounded the corner and the waves came crashing in. I worked my way into the wind as close to the shore as possible. As the waves filled up my boat the decoys started to float out and i would pick them up and toss the back in. When I made it to the main point of the lake I took on a big wave and my little boat couln't handle any more water, decoys floated out and i was in deep water. I made it back to shore and pulled my boat into the cattails and started to pick up decoys since I couldn't make it to the ramp. 4 hrs later another bigger boat came in and picked me up.
 

· Man without a Plan
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I was out snow goose hunting. And as I like to pass shot geese from the ditch I was putting a sneak on. Well the weather was just spitting a few drops of rain and a little cloud to cloud lightning was going on. I didn't think much of it even though I was holding a double barrel 10 ga. Well a flash so bright hit that I thought the bolt had hit behind me when in fact it had hit in front of me.
Well I was running back to my truck like a scolded dog.
Got permission to go out into the field where the geese were in the morning. Found out that at least sixty birds in a 100 yard radius died. And there was a 2ftx 2ft and 1ft deep crater where in the center with a cooked bird on the edge. By cooked I mean looked like someone had pulled it from the oven.
Let's just say my common sense has improved and if there is a thunderstorm in the area. I wait it out in the truck or call it a day.
 

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I wait it out in the truck or call it a day.
I'm not trying to be an ass, but what's stopping it from hitting your truck?

Or your house for that matter. I know of a person, their house got hit lightning went through the shower arced across to the sink and literally blew up the bathroom.

(I understand your house is much safer than the water or the middle of the field.)

When I was going to school I was standing on my porch watching a HUGE storm roll in. I took a few pictures (was under a roof). When I turned around and grabbed the door to go in the house my hand was almost to the handle, lightning must have hit the house (or nearby), something flashed across to my hand and shocked me pretty bad. My arm went numb, my ears popped, and I couldn't hear anything for a minute or so.
 

· Dakota Cyclone
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I was out snow goose hunting. And as I like to pass shot geese from the ditch I was putting a sneak on. Well the weather was just spitting a few drops of rain and a little cloud to cloud lightning was going on. I didn't think much of it even though I was holding a double barrel 10 ga. Well a flash so bright hit that I thought the bolt had hit behind me when in fact it had hit in front of me.
Well I was running back to my truck like a scolded dog.
Got permission to go out into the field where the geese were in the morning. Found out that at least sixty birds in a 100 yard radius died. And there was a 2ftx 2ft and 1ft deep crater where in the center with a cooked bird on the edge. By cooked I mean looked like someone had pulled it from the oven.
Let's just say my common sense has improved and if there is a thunderstorm in the area. I wait it out in the truck or call it a day.
That is proof that even god hates snow geese! lol
 

· Sarcastic
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I was out snow goose hunting. And as I like to pass shot geese from the ditch I was putting a sneak on. Well the weather was just spitting a few drops of rain and a little cloud to cloud lightning was going on. I didn't think much of it even though I was holding a double barrel 10 ga. Well a flash so bright hit that I thought the bolt had hit behind me when in fact it had hit in front of me.
Well I was running back to my truck like a scolded dog.
Got permission to go out into the field where the geese were in the morning. Found out that at least sixty birds in a 100 yard radius died. And there was a 2ftx 2ft and 1ft deep crater where in the center with a cooked bird on the edge. By cooked I mean looked like someone had pulled it from the oven.
Let's just say my common sense has improved and if there is a thunderstorm in the area. I wait it out in the truck or call it a day.
That is proof that even god hates snow geese! lol
I was thinking it was Gods way of saying don't hunt in the ditch......
 

· Man without a Plan
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I'm not trying to be an ass, but what's stopping it from hitting your truck?

Or your house for that matter. I know of a person, their house got hit lightning went through the shower arced across to the sink and literally blew up the bathroom.

(I understand your house is much safer than the water or the middle of the field.)

When I was going to school I was standing on my porch watching a HUGE storm roll in. I took a few pictures (was under a roof). When I turned around and grabbed the door to go in the house my hand was almost to the handle, lightning must have hit the house (or nearby), something flashed across to my hand and shocked me pretty bad. My arm went numb, my ears popped, and I couldn't hear anything for a minute or so.
True those things can happen. Lightning number 1 cause of death from any storm. But more things are grounded in house and a truck is grounded by the tires.

Better to be a live dog than a dead lion.
 

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Scariest moment I ever had was when me and two buddies were hunting a couple miles up the DM's river in single digit temps. Everything else was froze up so we made the trip south. While setting decoys, my buddy got a little too far off the shore and the sandy bottom gave out. I was prolly only 15 yards from him but I got to watch his head lamp flip flop as the river sucked him towards the middle and drag him under.

As I started to panic feeling helpless he some how kept his cool, dropped everything and swam as hard as he could back towards shore. Some how he managed to get his feet back under him with a waders full of water. He was in shock but managed to stay level headed. We headed back up shore about 300 yrds to the boat, he striped to his underware and we started the propane heater. About 2 min later the heater ran out of gas.

My other buddy and I frantically gathered wood up on the shore to start a fire. ( thank god for the flood the year before) We got a fire started and strung the anchor rope up in a tree so we could hang his clothes from it to dry them out. Needless to say the hunt was a bust but atleast I didn't loose another killer, Ive had enought bad luck with that in the last few years!!
 

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True those things can happen. Lightning number 1 cause of death from any storm. But more things are grounded in house and a truck is grounded by the tires.

Better to be a live dog than a dead lion.
Truck is isolated by the tires. But honestly, don't be fooled thinking your tires are going to stop lightning.

When you're talking the voltage in the millions (maybe billions) your tires aren't insulating shit. :) There's enough potential for the voltage to jump from the freaking sky to the ground (or vice versa) your 1/4 of rubber ain't stopping it ;) But you are right... much better than sitting in an aluminum boat or laying in a wet field!
 
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